Survey Data

Reg No

50100050


Rating

Regional


Categories of Special Interest

Architectural, Artistic


Previous Name

Scottish Temperance Life Assurance Company


Original Use

Bank/financial institution


In Use As

Shop/retail outlet


Date

1905 - 1915


Coordinates

315936, 233739


Date Recorded

23/05/2016


Date Updated

--/--/--


Description

Attached two-bay three-storey gable-fronted commercial premises with attic storey, built 1910-12 and dated 1911, having replacement timber shopfront. Full-height return and fully abutted to rear. Pitched slate roof, hidden by raking parapet with limestone coping, and having concealed rainwater goods. Orange brick walling laid to English garden wall bond, with limestone dressings, stepped quoins, and having flush platbands at first and second floor window head levels. Square-headed window openings having moulded limestone architraves, moulded sills and cornices, latter to first floor being linked by segmental drip-moulding over carved date-stone in limestone panel. Group of three attic windows in carved limestone frame, each window separated by engaged Doric columns, having entablature with segmental central section over carved laurel wreath, and shared moulded sill on four corbels. Timber sliding sash windows, one-over-one pane to first floor and attic and six-over-one pane to second floor (lower sashes taller than upper).

Appraisal

An eclectic commercial building, dated 1911, built to designs by Orpen & Dickinson for the Scottish Temperance Life Assurance Co. The builder was H.& J. Martin. The design is rather restrained, redolent of Flemish styles combined with Arts & Crafts influences and typical of the free styles of the period. It was possibly inspired by the early building typologies in the area with their origins in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The fa├žade is much enlivened by the use of contrasting pale grey stone with vibrant orange brick. The building makes a strong and assured contribution to the architectural vitality and eclecticism of Grafton Street, a thoroughfare that was largely developed in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and is celebrated as Dublin's premier retail street.