Survey Data

Reg No

15503082


Date

1815 - 1835


County

County Wexford


Coordinates

304854, 121881


Description

End-of-terrace single-bay four-storey house, extant 1840, on a rectangular plan with remains of timber shopfront to ground floor; five-bay four-storey side (south) elevation. Refenestrated, ----. Hipped slate roof with ridge tiles, and replacement uPVC rainwater goods on box eaves. Rendered, ruled and lined walls. Remains of timber shopfront to ground floor. Square-headed central window openings (upper floors) with cut-granite sills, and concealed dressings framing replacement uPVC casement windows replacing one-over-one (first floor), six-over-six (second floor) or three-over-six (top floor) timber sash windows. Segmental-headed central door opening (south) with cut-granite threshold, and concealed dressings having splayed reveals framing timber panelled door having overlight. Square-headed window openings (upper floors) with cut-granite sills, and concealed dressings framing replacement uPVC casement windows replacing one-over-one (first floor), six-over-six (second floor) or three-over-six (top floor) timber sash windows. Interior including (ground floor): hall (south) retaining tessellated "quarry tile" floor, and timber boarded wainscoting centred on carved timber surrounds to door openings framing timber panelled doors; and (upper floors) carved timber surrounds to door openings framing timber panelled doors with timber panelled shutters to window openings. Street fronted on a corner site with concrete brick cobbled footpath to front.

Appraisal

A house representing an integral component of the built heritage of Wexford with the architectural value of the composition, one allegedly erected as the townhouse of the Rowes of Ballycross House (see 15704731; Kehoe 1985, 47), suggested by such attributes as the elongated rectilinear plan form; and the diminishing in scale of the centralised openings on each floor producing a graduated visual impression. Having been well maintained, the elementary form and massing survive intact together with quantities of the original fabric, both to the exterior and to the interior where contemporary joinery; and restrained Kilkenny limestone chimneypieces, all highlight the modest artistic potential of the composition: however, the recent introduction of replacement fittings to most of the openings has not had a beneficial impact on the character or integrity of a house making an imposing visual statement in Main Street North. NOTE: A plaque (1987) commemorates the first meeting of the Council of the Wexford County Gaelic Athletics Association (GAA) in 1886.