Survey Data

Reg No

15402721


Rating

Regional


Categories of Special Interest

Architectural Technical


Original Use

Store/warehouse


In Use As

Store/warehouse


Date

1860 - 1890


Coordinates

256089, 249575


Date Recorded

27/10/2004


Date Updated

--/--/--


Description

Detached six-bay former railway goods shed associated with Killucan Railway Station (now largely demolished), built c.1848, with lean-to shed to west gable end. Multi-pitched gable-fronted roof with raised limestone verges to either end (north and south). Roof now covered with glazed panels to west-facing pitch. Constructed of coursed roughly dressed limestone with rock-faced quoins to the corners. Round-headed windows to north and south facing elevations with cut stone sills. Cast-iron glazing to windows overlooking track to the south, windows to the north now mostly blocked. Square-headed carriage arches to the second bay from each end to the north facing elevation having timber sheeted doors. Located to the east of largely demolished Killucan Railway Station with cut stone platforms running along trackside to the south.

Appraisal

An interesting piece of mid nineteenth-century railway architecture associated with the now largely demolished Killucan Station, which was built to designs by the renowned architect J. S. Mulvany (1813-1870), c.1848, to serve the Midland and Great Western Railway Company's Dublin to Mullingar line. This station was opened in 1848 and closed in 1963. This robust former goods shed has an interesting design and is built using good quality limestone. The retention of the cast-iron windows to the south elevation is a noteworthy survival. The scale of this structure gives an historical insight into the importance of the railway network for the transportation of heavy goods at the time. This former goods shed now acts as a reminder of the now sadly demolished train station and is a worthy addition to the built heritage of the local area. The cut stone platforms to either side of the track and the remains of the train station to the west completes the setting.