Survey Data

Reg No

11805062


Rating

Regional


Categories of Special Interest

Architectural, Artistic, Historical, Social


Original Use

House


Historical Use

Garda station/constabulary barracks


In Use As

House


Date

1715 - 1725


Coordinates

297468, 233189


Date Recorded

16/05/2002


Date Updated

--/--/--


Description

Attached three-bay single-storey over raised basement house with half-dormer attic, built 1719-20, on a symmetrical plan; five-bay three-storey rear (east) elevation. Sold, 1749. In alternative use, 1782-1814. In alternative use, 1830. In alternative use, 1831-1841. Leased, 1861. Repaired, 1862. Occupied, 1901; 1911. Restored, 1985; 2003. Hipped slate roof on a quadrangular plan centred on pitched (gabled) slate roof, clay or terracotta ridge tiles, red brick chimney stacks having shallow stringcourses below capping, and cast-iron rainwater goods on chevron- or saw tooth-detailed red brick cornice retaining cast-iron downpipes. Repointed walls on repointed red brick Flemish bond cushion course on repointed base with repointed rough hewn limestone flush quoins to corners. Camber-headed central door opening approached by flight of nine cut-limestone steps with repointed red brick surround framing glazed timber panelled double doors having fanlight. Round-headed window opening (half-dormer attic) with cut-limestone sill, and repointed red brick surround framing six-over-six timber sash window without horns. Square-headed window openings (basement) with repointed red brick header bond rounded sills, and repointed red brick surrounds framing timber sash windows without horns behind wrought iron bars. Square-headed window openings with cut-limestone sills, and repointed red brick surrounds framing six-over-six (ground floor) or three-over-three (half-dormer attic) timber sash windows without horns. Square-headed central door opening to rear (east) elevation with repointed red brick surround framing glazed timber panelled door having overlight. Square-headed window openings with repointed red brick surrounds framing six-over-six or three-over-three (top floor) timber sash windows without horns. Interior including (ground floor): central hall retaining carved timber surrounds to door openings framing timber panelled doors; and carved timber surrounds to door openings to remainder framing timber panelled doors with carved timber surrounds to window openings framing timber panelled shutters on panelled risers. Set back from street in landscaped grounds with flat iron-detailed wrought iron railings to perimeter.

Appraisal

A house erected by Robert Baillie (d. 1761) to designs attributed to Thomas Burgh (1670-1730) representing an important component of the early eighteenth-century domestic built heritage of County Kildare with the architectural value of the composition, one resembling a scaled-down Mount Ievers (1730-7) in County Clare (de Breffny 1975, 90-1), confirmed by such attributes as the deliberate alignment maximising on scenic vistas overlooking the River Liffey; the compact plan form centred on a restrained doorcase showing a replica fanlight; the diminishing in scale of the openings on each floor producing a graduated visual impression; and the pedimented roofline. Having been well maintained, the form and massing survive intact together with substantial quantities of the original fabric, both to the exterior and to the interior, including crown or cylinder glazing panels in hornless sash frames: however, the removal of the surface finish has not had a beneficial impact on the character or integrity of a house making a pleasing visual statement in Main Street. NOTE: The home of John Begnall's Celbridge Academy (fl. 1782-1814) and later occupied by Reverend Aiken Irvine AM (d. 1880) '[of] Kildrought House Celbridge County Kildare' (Journal of the Royal Historical and Archaeological Association of Ireland 1870, 9; 1876, 9).