Survey Data

Reg No

11362029


Rating

National


Categories of Special Interest

Architectural Artistic Historical


Original Use

Country house


In Use As

Country house


Date

1850 - 1885


Coordinates

309169, 236216


Date Recorded

13/07/2005


Date Updated

--/--/--


Description

Detached multiple-bay three-storey house over basement, built 1881. Pedimented two-bay entrance breakfront with port cochere. Farmleigh, an estate of 78 acres situated to the north-west of Dublin's Phoenix Park, was purchased from the Guinness family by the Irish Government in 1999. The house has been refurbished by the Office of Public Works as accommodation for visiting dignitaries, for high level Government meetings, and for public enjoyment. Originally a small Georgian house built in the late 18th century, Farmleigh was purchased by Edward Cecil Guinness (1847-1927) on his marriage to his cousin, Adelaide Guinness in 1873. A great-grandson of Arthur Guinness, founder of the eponymous brewery, Edward Cecil became the first Earl of Iveagh in 1919. The first major building programme was undertaken in 1881-84 to designs by Irish architect James Franklin Fuller (1832-1925), who extended the House to the west, refurbished the existing house, and added a third storey. In 1896 the Ballroom wing was added, designed by the Scottish architect William Young (1843-1900). With the addition of a new Conservatory adjoining the Ballroom in 1901, increased planting of broadleaves and exotics in the gardens, Farmleigh had, by the early years of the 20th century, all the requisites for gracious living and stylish entertainment. Its great charm lies in the eclecticism of its interior decoration ranging from the classical style to Jacobean, Louis XV, Louis XVI and Georgian.