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St. Lucy's Well, Killua Castle, Clonmellon, County Westmeath
15306025
View from the east.
Reg. No.15306025
Date1780 - 1820
Previous NameN/A
TownlandKILLUA
CountyCounty Westmeath
Coordinates266658, 268229
Categories of Special InterestARTISTIC ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORICAL
RatingRegional
Original Usemonument
 
Description
Well housing holy well, built c.1800, consisting of an earthen and rubble stone mound on irregular plan containing a small limestone-faced chamber on square plan with corbelled limestone roof. Cut stone round-headed arch to west face gives entry to well, which is now dry. Oval stone over archway with carved inscription 'St. Lucy'. Loose rubble limestone enclosing walls flank entrance on west face with two steps down to well. Well is associated with an early medieval church site dedicated to St. Lua, which is sited to the south. Located to east of former walled garden within Killua Castle Demesne.

Appraisal

An attractive and well-built small scale monument, which is said to have been erected by Sir Benjamin Chapman when he laid out the walled gardens and pleasure grounds to the east of Killua Castle. According to local tradition the original St. Lucy's well was covered up when the pleasure grounds were being laid out and that this well subsequently sprang up in its present location. Sir Benjamin Chapman seems to have had a liking for romantic 'sham antiquities' and built a number on the Killua Castle Demesne. The original well, which this may be, was associated with an early medieval church site dedicated to St. Lua. This church site is located to the south in the townland of Knock Killua (WM009-043---) and was also rebuilt as a romantic ruin by Sir Benjamin Chapman using fabric from the existing church site and from another at Moyagher Co. Meath. The cut-stone plaque and voussoirs to arched entrance are of artistic merit. This structure makes a positive contribution to the historic nature of the Killua Castle demesne.
 
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