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The Candy Store / Prosperity Chambers, 5-6 O'Connell Street Upper, Dublin, Dublin City
50010538
Front elevation
Reg. No.50010538
Date1915 - 1920
Previous NameN/A
Townland
CountyDublin City
Coordinates315917, 234717
Categories of Special InterestARCHITECTURAL ARTISTIC
RatingRegional
Original Useshop/retail outlet
In Use Asshop/retail outlet
 
Description
Terraced three-bay five-storey commercial building, built 1917, as part of terrace of six similarly detailed buildings with recent shopfronts to ground floor. Flat roof behind parapet wall with granite coping and red brick chimneystacks to both party walls. Machine-made red brick walls laid in Flemish Bond with channel rusticated limestone soldier quoins to either end from first floor to parapet. Shallow central breakfront rising from second floor to the parapet defined by rusticated red brick quoins and raised coping to the parapet. Moulded granite plat band to base of the parapet with deep moulded modillioned granite cornice and frieze defining attic storey. Horizontal mouldings extend across all six buildings. Gauged brick camber-arched window openings to second to fourth floors with original timber casement windows and granite sills. First floor has three original timber canted windows flanked by stepped granite piers supporting voussoired granite frieze and full-span cornice. Central square-headed door opening to ground floor with inset double-leaf glazed hardwood doors, rectangular overlight and iron concertina gate. Door opening flanked by pair of replacement shopfronts all surmounted by deep moulded granite frieze and fluted granite console bracket to either end.

Appraisal

This three-bay building forms the central part of a block of six similarly detailed buildings with the symmetry lost to the southernmost building. Designed by John Joseph Robinson along with No. 7, as part of part of the reconstruction of O'Connell Street following the extensive destruction of the 1916 Rising. The building retains most original windows and detailing and forms an informal but coherent composition of early twentieth-century architecture on the city's main thoroughfare.
 
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