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County Monaghan

 
Please click on the links below for an individual highlight.
Brick
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Castle Leslie
Market buildings
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Buildings of the Bath Estate
Ulster Canal
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Corrugated Iron
 
 
Currin Rectory, Monaghan Town, Co. Monaghan

Brick

Usually associated with Ireland's largest towns and cities, brick was surprisingly common in County Monaghan, in rural as well as urban areas. The brick buildings provide a colourful contrast to the grey limestone more generally used on historic buildings, and is often used in conjunction with stone to provide variety. A combination of red brick with yellow brick trim is a feature of large numbers of chimneystacks, on rendered and stone buildings also. Particularly fine examples of brick buildings are Derryolam House, near Carrickmacross, and there is excellent brick detailing at Bessmount House, near Monaghan Town. Many of the buildings in and around the Dawsongrove estate, near Rockcorry, are of brick. View Buildings

Castle Leslie, Main Street, Glaslough, Co. Monaghan

Castle Leslie

One of the most intact demesnes in County Monaghan is that of Castle Leslie, at Glaslough. The rambling Tudor Revival country house, designed by William Lynn and built in 1874-8 to replace a seventeenth-century house, is a cornucopia of features and details. There are fine ancillary buildings and gardens, a picturesque group of gateways and gate lodges, a folly tower, an estate church and a pretty boathouse (featured on the cover of An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan). Glaslough itself was developed by the Leslie family from the seventeenth century onwards and is one of the most pleasant villages in Ireland. The substantial monument to the Leslies on the main street emphasises the connection between demesne and village. View Buildings

Clones Market House, The Diamond, MacCurtain Street, Clones, Co. Monaghan

Market buildings

Market houses form a distinctive group of public buildings in the towns and villages of Monaghan. An arcaded ground floor and a rooftop pediment are consistent features of such buildings. The building of 1792 in the county town is undoubtedly one of the finest in Ireland. View Buildings

Weymouth Cottages, St Joseph

Buildings of the Bath Estate

The western side of Carrickmacross town was developed by the Shirley family and the eastern by the Thynne family. The latter became Viscounts Weymouth and later, Marquisses of Bath. While both families instigated a distinctive architecture in the town, the Bath estate applied their own corporate identity, a shield device with the letter 'B' and a date on their buildings. They constructed workers' housing, forges and limekilns. View Buildings

Templetate Lock, Ulster Canal, Co. Monaghan

Ulster Canal

The Ulster Canal was designed to connect Belfast with Limerick, by way of Lough Neagh, Lough Erne and the River Shannon. It was started in 1830 and completed in 1859. However, it was never successful, for two reasons – the locks were narrower than was the norm on Ireland's other canal systems, and the advent of the railways meant that the canal could never be viable. Today it is a rather forlorn feature of the Monaghan landscape and much of it filled-in. Many locks and lockkeepers' houses survive, as do most of the arched canal bridges. In Monaghan Town, at Old Cross Square, the canal is contained within Ireland's longest canal tunnel. There are proposals to reopen stretches of the canal. View Buildings

St Peter

Corrugated Iron

Corrugated iron was developed in Britain the early nineteenth century as a response to the need for roofing railway stations and large warehouses. Later in the century the material came into use for the construction of a wide range of smaller buildings. Monaghan has an interesting and representative group of corrugated-iron structures. The NIAH survey recorded five community halls, two houses, a creamery and a church. The customs station at Monaghan Road, now gone, was also of corrugated iron. The very picturesque Saint Peter's Church at Laragh is one of the most impressive examples in Ireland and is undergoing conservation. View Buildings

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